Sunday, November 6, 2016

Vehicle Movements in Non-Permissive Environs - PART 2

Low profile


Method of Movement

Due to the fact that it is very difficult for a solitary vehicle to defend itself effectively we will create an SOP that all movements will consist of two vehicles, a lead/primary and a follow/secondary. The primary is tasked with accomplishing the "mission" (picking up a local supporter, etc) while the follow vehicle follows at a safe distance (will vary depending on road/traffic conditions) and provides overwatch.

As an example, lets say that your primary vic (vehicle) is heading down a lightly traveled rural highway with follow vic a quarter mile or so behind. On long straight stretches of highway, follow vic would drift back and increase distance, keeping primary in sight. If the road gets congested or starts winding around, follow would close the distance as needed. The goal here is to keep primary in sight (as well as maintaining comms - we will cover that later) without giving away the fact that you are supporting the primary. You also want to stay within the range capability of your weapon systems (not to mention the operator's expertise level).

Lets say that primary vic is stopped by a local gang's roadblock or perhaps a rouge government agent executes a "pull-over". Follow vic would make comms with primary so as to keep an ear on what was happening and either pull over and prepare to support by fire, or rapidly make approach as the situation dictates. Ideally you would have a minimum of two people in each vehicle. The driver focuses on driving and the passenger/TC deals with operations.

This order of movement can also be reversed with the primary in the rear if you have a high-value person or item inside the primary. The lead vehicle would act as a probe or pointman, keeping the primary vic buffered as needed.

Once primary reaches it's target it will notify home/base (using brevity codes unless you are lucky enough to have secure comms). Follow vehicle will park in overwatch or "satellite" the area, depending on the situation. A third vehicle with your QRF (quick reaction force) would be on standby at your home/base for the duration of the mission. In the event that the primary/follow teams need support or rescue the QRF team would launch. The QRF should have your largest vehicle and should be heavily armed. The QRF may need to fill multiple roles including that of ambulance and should have the necessary medical support equipment on board.

Equipping the Rig

We are assuming that you will have only soft-skin (non-armored) vehicles at your disposal as armored vehicles in the US are a rather expensive affair, both in initial cost and upkeep. With that in mind, remember that lacking armor - speed (or mobility) equals security.

This is a basic list for what we would keep in our rigs while operating in said environment:


- Fire extinguisher
- Fix-a-flat and puncture kit (x4)
- Spare tire w/tools
- 110ac power inverter
- binoculars
- seatbelt cutter/window breaker tool
- case of drinking water
- spare magazines for rifles/pistols
- weapons maintenance kit
- basic toolbox
- large bolt cutters
- tow strap/snap-strap
- medical bag
- VS-17 panel (you can make your own if needed)
- IR/WL strobe
- box of caltrops
- smoke grenades (HC and colored)
- road flares
- aerial flare
- spare batteries (for radios, GPS, flashlights, NVGs, etc)
- Jump pack w/air compressor
- compass
- GPS unit
- Radio (GMRS/CB/HAM whatever your unit is using)
- Scanner/Bearcat
- solar charger (for 12v system)
- shovel/pick/e-tool
- poncho liner (especially if in a cold climate)
- lighters/matches
- spare engine fluids
- come-along (if vic does not have a winch)
- gas can
- roll of dark fabric screen or mesh and clothespins
- windshield blocker/dash saver
- Optional - camo netting large enough to cover rig if you need to cache
- and of course, duck tape and 550 cord
Useful but overt bag - consider civilian bag with internal pouches
You can tailor this to fit your needs, but this will give you the basic necessities to keep the vehicle rolling in a bad situation. All "tactical" items such as magazines and long guns should be out of sight to someone walking around the outside of the vehicle. It goes without saying that tinted windows are a huge plus.

Keep in mind this list is separate from your personal go-bag, which may contain some of these items as well.

***

Next article will cover dressing for success.

- Dressing around your equipment
- Low profile fundamentals/establishing baseline
- Long gun storage and deployment
- Body Armor


Soft skin vehicle aftermath - bad day for them






2 comments:

  1. Good series so far! One point you might consider is making sure all this equipment is organized and stowed in a manner that ensures the most vital equipment is most accessible. For example; tow straps, first aid kits, fire extinguisher, ammo and other items you might need during/ immediately after an ambush should be the easiest to get to so you can get moving again as quickly as possible. And if you can't get moving again, and have to abandon a vehicle you want to be able to take your most critical items with you (comms gear, ammo, etc.) Also, you want to ensure everything is secured down as best as possible, since all those objects can suddenly turn into projectiles if you need to stop suddenly.

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    1. Good observations. We would keep most of the secondary gear in a ratcheted down toughbox in the back and mags under the seats in old Nam era magazine bandoleers. Heads up items would be velcro'd to the dash with secondary velcro under the dash if it needs to go out of sight.

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